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Published on : Sep 10, 2016
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Slide 1 - Design Tips for Using Color
Slide 2 - Identify and discuss various functions of color in design Define terms related to color Offer some tips on using color as a design tool Objectives
Slide 3 - Hmmmm . . . How are we affected by color? Do we respond to certain colors in a certain way? How did we learn these responses?
Slide 4 - Color Contributions Can influence mood and receptiveness Provide visual variety Focus attention Enhance meaning
Slide 5 - Color Contributions Clarify information Establish consistent look Indicate real world appearance
Slide 6 - Presentation Elements
Slide 7 - The Color Wheel
Slide 8 - The Color Wheel Colors across the wheel from each other are said to be “complementary”
Slide 9 - The Color Wheel Careful! There are color models that use Red, Blue and Yellow as primaries Complementary colors will be different with each model
Slide 10 - The Color Wheel Color “opposites” is a better description!
Slide 11 - The Color Wheel Color “opposites” do not work well when placed next to each other Especially, fully saturated opposites Red & Green - Yuk!
Slide 12 - Readability
Slide 13 - Contrast Defined The difference between the “lightest” lights and the “darkest” darks. The highest contrast is black with white
Slide 14 - Color Contrast Defined The relative difference between two adjacent colors.
Slide 15 - Contrast Types for Color
Slide 16 - Hue Contrast Colors have “hue” contrast when they are opposites on the color wheel.
Slide 17 - Hue Contrast
Slide 18 - Hue Contrast
Slide 19 - Hue Contrast
Slide 20 - If You Must UseOpposites Together Reduce saturation of at least one hue -
Slide 21 - Separate with a black or white line - If You Must UseOpposites Together
Slide 22 - Separate by distance - If You Must UseOpposites Together
Slide 23 - Saturation Contrast Contrast increases as differences in saturation increase -
Slide 24 - Saturation Contrast Contrast increases as differences in brightness increase -
Slide 25 - Sample Contrast Combinations
Slide 26 - Sample Contrast Combinations
Slide 27 - Sample Contrast Combinations
Slide 28 - The Color Wheel Colors next to each other are said to be “analogous” Sometimes called “spectral neighbors They work well as schemes
Slide 29 - The Color Wheel Good for highlight color combinations Not good for fore/background combinations because . . .
Slide 30 - Spectral Neighbors Have low hue contrast!
Slide 31 - Spectral Neighbors Avoid use when distinct separation is desired! -- Pie chart pieces -- Foreground/Background text combos
Slide 32 - Spectral Neighbors Work well as shadow or “highlight colors.
Slide 33 - Color Triads -Primary Equally spaced around the color wheel Generally, aren’t pleasing combinations
Slide 34 - Equally spaced around the color wheel Generally, aren’t pleasing combinations Color Triads - Secondary
Slide 35 - Color Categories “Warm” Colors Moderate saturation - Reds - Oranges - Yellows - Browns
Slide 36 - Hot Colors . . . Can cause viewer fatigue!!
Slide 37 - Color Categories “Cool” Colors Moderate saturation - Blues - Greens
Slide 38 - Cool Colors . . . Can make a viewer passive!
Slide 39 - Neutral Colors . . . Serve a good backdrops for most highlights.
Slide 40 - Color Tips Limit the number of hues - some suggest no more 5 Goal of color is to enhance design not make a busy, distracting message
Slide 41 - Color Tips Children prefer bright, “fun” colors They shy away from dark, moody colors
Slide 42 - Color Tips Avoid limited contrast for older adults - our eyes don’t work as well as they used to!
Slide 43 - Color Tips Avoid deeply saturated colors placed next to each other - they tend to shimmer on the
Slide 44 - Color Tips Bright colors attract attention good for bullets buttons etc But, don’t overwhelm viewer
Slide 45 - Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Color can highlight steps in a process Color Tips
Slide 46 - Color Tips Emphasize important words or elements with color. Highlight important words for emphasis
Slide 47 - Color Tips
Slide 48 - Curriculum Content and Activities created by Dr. Mark Mortensen Dept. of Technology & Cognition University of North Texas Copyright C. Mark Mortensen 2001