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Slide 1 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume
Slide 2 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet
Slide 3 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE
Slide 4 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships
Slide 5 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design?
Slide 6 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design?
Slide 7 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented?
Slide 8 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it?
Slide 9 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed?
Slide 10 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology?
Slide 11 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore
Slide 12 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator
Slide 13 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused
Slide 14 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have
Slide 15 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help
Slide 16 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group
Slide 17 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration
Slide 18 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats
Slide 19 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet
Slide 20 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter
Slide 21 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume
Slide 22 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map
Slide 23 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace
Slide 24 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample).
Slide 25 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3
Slide 26 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g
Slide 27 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration
Slide 28 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks.
Slide 29 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here
Slide 30 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement
Slide 31 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass
Slide 32 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity.
Slide 33 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape
Slide 34 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship
Slide 35 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water
Slide 36 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy
Slide 37 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle
Slide 38 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line
Slide 39 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter
Slide 40 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M
Slide 41 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough.
Slide 42 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design.
Slide 43 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m.
Slide 44 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype
Slide 45 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy
Slide 46 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs?
Slide 47 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address?
Slide 48 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy?
Slide 49 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features?
Slide 50 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video
Slide 51 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region?
Slide 52 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water
Slide 53 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min
Slide 54 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?”
Slide 55 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design
Slide 56 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2
Slide 57 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective
Slide 58 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective Improving on design Teams are to go back together and reevaluate their calculations to determine the following: Explanations for percentage error Stability of their prototype and what improvements could be made If they were to make another prototype what would they do differently?
Slide 59 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective Improving on design Teams are to go back together and reevaluate their calculations to determine the following: Explanations for percentage error Stability of their prototype and what improvements could be made If they were to make another prototype what would they do differently? The Littoral Class We looked at stability and buoyancy. What other variables might have to be addressed in building of a prototype?
Slide 60 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective Improving on design Teams are to go back together and reevaluate their calculations to determine the following: Explanations for percentage error Stability of their prototype and what improvements could be made If they were to make another prototype what would they do differently? The Littoral Class We looked at stability and buoyancy. What other variables might have to be addressed in building of a prototype? The Littoral Class How will designing versatile and flexible ships prepare us to handle the future?
Slide 61 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective Improving on design Teams are to go back together and reevaluate their calculations to determine the following: Explanations for percentage error Stability of their prototype and what improvements could be made If they were to make another prototype what would they do differently? The Littoral Class We looked at stability and buoyancy. What other variables might have to be addressed in building of a prototype? The Littoral Class How will designing versatile and flexible ships prepare us to handle the future? The Littoral Class Given the safety concerns about some modern cruise ships, how might one prevent future accidents like the Costa Concordia?
Slide 62 - Future Fleet Science Topics: Buoyancy, Density and Volume Future Fleet SESSION ONE History of Failed Ships History of Failed Ships What is the economic cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships What is the human cost of a failed ship design? History of Failed Ships How can the tragic losses in the article be prevented? History of Failed Ships Is it possible to know how much a ship will cost before you build it? History of Failed Ships Can an unsinkable ship be designed? History of Failed Ships Is it possible for a tragedy at sea to happen today, even with current technology? Lets Explore Exploration Teams Assigning the teams Roles Task manager Activity recorder Life Line Evaluator Task manager Keep group members focused Activity recorder Records what the group does and what questions the members have Life Line Can leave the group to seek help Evaluator Judge the effectiveness of the group Report back only to the group The Stations How Metal "Boats" Float (5 min) Liquid Density and Lava Lamp (5 min) Soda Can Pirouette (5 min) Students should move to their teams now and begin the exploration TIME IS UP Please return to your seats REPORT Each group should now report on the following: Name one thing you learned that has not been mentioned yet Definitions and Calculations Density Displacement Mass Buoyancy Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Metacenter Density D = M / V Solve the equation for mass M = D x V Mass can now be calculated The degree of compactness of a substance Mass per unit of Volume The Density of Water Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity. Look at the Salinity Map Salinity Map Look at the Temperature Map Temperature Map Displacement Mass The mass of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ship) of equal mass 460 mega kilograms of water To stay afloat A 460 mega kilogram ship Needs to Displace The Calculation of Displacement Mass 1) Find the density of water of operational area Density is influenced by depth, temperature, and salinity We will use about 34 PSU* Salinity as an operational area Salinity Map We will use about 30 degrees Celsius as an operational area Temperature Map At 20m depth the density will be 1.021 g/cm3 *PSU * Salinity is measured by conductivity (how easily electricity flows through a seawater sample). The Calculation of Displacement Mass 2) Find the volume of water being displaced Take the cross sectional area height x width 30 m x 5m 5 m 30m 3 m x 3m and multiply by the 3rd dimension to find volume This gives us a Volume of 450 m3 The Calculation of Displacement Mass 3) Find the displacement mass M = V x D Volume of Water (cm3) x Density (g / cm3) (450 m3 x 1,000,000 cm3 / m3 ) x 1.021 g/cm3 459450000 g Weight vs. Mass So the volume can displace a mass of 459450000 grams or a weight of 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 9.8 m/s2 = 4,502,610 N or 459450000 g x (1kg/1000 g) * 2.2lbs/kg= 1,010,790 lbs or 505.4 Tons - Weight is a force - Force in general is mass times acceleration Buoyancy What is Buoyancy? Buoyancy is the upward force that a fluid exerts on an object less dense then itself. As mass is added, the boat displaces more water until the weight of the displaced water equals the weight of the boat; then the boat sinks. Archimedes's principle. An object immersed in a fluid is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. Put picture of floating boy here 5 m 30m 3 m A 500 Ton ship needs to displace a volume of 450m3 to avoid sinking Summary of Buoyancy and Displacement Displacement of irregular shapes Use graph paper to approximate the cross sectional area Then find the displacement mass Center of Gravity What is the Center of Gravity? The center of gravity is the geometric property that represents the average location of the weight of an object. We can balance the scale by moving the fulcrum to the center of gravity. How do we find the Center of Gravity? Hang the object from a point Hang a weighted string from the point and when it comes to a rest draw a line Repeat with another point on the shape Center of Buoyancy Is the center of gravity of the displaced water The center of buoyancy changes as the ship rolls and pitches The balance between center of buoyancy and center of gravity affects stability of the ship Metacenter Ship Water Center of Gravity Center of Buoyancy Ship rolled at a small angle New center of buoyancy Line of force for new center of buoyancy perpendicular to water line The intersection of the two lines of force form the metacenter The distance from the metacenter (M) to the center of gravity (G) is called the metacentric height (GM). G M Metacenter A positive GM is needed to make a stable ship The higher the GM the more stable the ship The higher the GM the faster the ship will right itself. If this number becomes too high the ride will become rough. Elaborate Work in your teams to come up with general guidelines for ship design. Exit Ticket Find the displacement of mass of a ship segment with cross sectional dimensions of 30m by 8 m and a length of 10m. SESSION TWO Build a Prototype The Littoral Class Future Ships of the Navy The Littoral Class Why did the Navy use two different designs? The Littoral Class What need is the Navy trying to address? The Littoral Class What aspects of the design of the ships address the needs of the Navy? The Littoral Class Why do you think using all new 21st century technology was important to these features? LCS and Pirates Click me to see Somalia Click me To see video The Littoral Class How could the LCS class ships help support operations in the region? The design requirements Length must be 128 cm Width 32 cm Displacement depth 4.3 cm Hull shape up to the designers but ship must be stable and must displace its weight in water Design Time Planning and calculations Build Time 25min 35min Evaluate The students will work in their design team on a brief description of their prototype. In this description the students should address the aspects of their prototype that are most closely related to a real ship (displacement and buoyancy). Students should then give themselves a confidence rating. This should represent how successful the ship will be in a full scale prototype. Focusing only on aspects related to a real ship, students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” The students should answer the question - “Is the design of their prototype worth spending several million dollars to test at full scale?” SESSION THREE Testing our Design Presentations Each group will have 3 minutes to present their design to the class using the evaluation from Session 2 Evaluation of design Each team will put their prototype in the water tank and have it tested by the instructor. All students will record data on a rubric for each prototype. There are three categories: Percentage error between predicted water line and actual water line (tank can have dye or food coloring in it to help denote the actual water line for measurement) Stability test under wave creation. Three levels of intensity for waves should be tested by dropping a weight in the water a short distance from the ship. Overall design appeal and creativity – this is subjective Improving on design Teams are to go back together and reevaluate their calculations to determine the following: Explanations for percentage error Stability of their prototype and what improvements could be made If they were to make another prototype what would they do differently? The Littoral Class We looked at stability and buoyancy. What other variables might have to be addressed in building of a prototype? The Littoral Class How will designing versatile and flexible ships prepare us to handle the future? The Littoral Class Given the safety concerns about some modern cruise ships, how might one prevent future accidents like the Costa Concordia? Congratulations on finishing your designs of Future Fleet