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Slide 1 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding
Slide 2 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding
Slide 3 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding
Slide 4 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London.
Slide 5 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26
Slide 6 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26
Slide 7 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 8 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 9 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 10 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 11 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 12 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003.
Slide 13 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003. Heritage tourism
Slide 14 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003. Heritage tourism Literary tourism: Haworth and the Brontes
Slide 15 - Keeping Butler on the beach : embedding tourism in modernity Charles Rawding Traditional definitions. ‘the temporary movement of people to destinations outside their normal places of work and residence, the activities undertaken during their stay in those destinations and the facilities created to care to their need.’ (Mathieson & Wall, 1982) defining tourism by what it isn’t – it is not home, it is not work; it is a change of scenery and lifestyle, an inversion of the normal ‘tourism includes all travel that involves a stay of at least one night, but less than one year, away from home’ (World Tourism Office) Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. Recent definitions. Tourism derives from the condition of life in modernity and the experience of modernity not an escape from it. Tourism is more than travel; tourism is more about the accessibility of novelty and the modern world generally. Tourism is consumerism in a globalising modernity Tourism is an embodied experience not simply a visual experience. Tourism is a central component of modern social identity formation and engagement rather than something shallow and insignificant that takes place on the social margin. Tourism is infused into the everyday and has become one of the ways in which our lives are ordered and one of the ways in which consumers orientate themselves, or take a stance to a globalised world. Tourism is now far too blended into everyday life and the global flows of people and things to be treated as a detachable phenomenon. The everyday world is increasingly indistinguishable from the touristic world. Almost everywhere has become mantled with touristic properties Source: A Franklin. Tourism : an introduction. 2003. Sage London. p26 Holiday Holiday Business Business Business Family None None None Social April May June September June Flights taken by Charles Rawding during 2003. Heritage tourism Literary tourism: Haworth and the Brontes Television tourism: Goathland and Heartbeat